Weekend Edition Sunday on KSJD

Weekend Edition Sunday premiered on January 18, 1987, and was the last of NPR's major newsmagazines to hit the air. Since then, Weekend Edition Sunday has covered newsmakers, artists, scientists, politicans, musicians, writers, thinkers, theologians and all manner of news events. Originally hosted by Susan Stamberg, the show has been anchored by Liane Hansen since 1989. Senior News Analyst Daniel Schorr and Puzzlemaster Will Shortz have been with the program from the beginning, and a wide variety of commentators and essayists help round out the weekly offerings: humorist Andy Borowitz slings satirical arrows at big-shots, celebrities, and politicans of all stripes; Diane Roberts takes a sometimes hilarious, sometimes poignant view of life in the South; and transplanted Brit Tim Brookes offers his impressions of life on these shores. For more information, please go to: http://www.npr.org/templates/rundowns/rundown.php?prgId=10 

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World
8:17 am
Fri January 9, 2015

Mideast Conflict Could Bog Down International Criminal Court

Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas has accused Israel of committing war crimes against the Palestinians. The Palestinians have joined the International Criminal Court, a move that has angered Israel and is unlikely to lead to any prosecutions in the near term.
Abbas Momani AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun January 11, 2015 9:26 am

The Palestinian decision to join the International Criminal Court this month comes at a challenging time for the world's only permanent war crimes tribunal.

The ICC is just over a decade old and has had to back off from some controversial cases, including one in Kenya, where an investigation collapsed into the country's president for election violence. The Hague-based court may have to walk an especially fine line in the Middle East.

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Around the Nation
9:19 am
Sun January 4, 2015

NYPD Officer's Funeral Binds Diversity In Culture And Opinion

Originally published on Sun January 4, 2015 10:20 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Sunday Puzzle
8:19 am
Sun January 4, 2015

A Winter Puzzle To Brrring In The New Year

Sunday Puzzle
NPR

Originally published on Sun January 4, 2015 10:20 am

Editor's Note: In a previous version of this page we posted the wrong on-air challenge. The correct on-air challenge for the week is posted below.

On-air challenge: Given a clue, each response is a two-word answer with the first word starting with B-R and the second word starting with R.

Last week's challenge: Take the following 5-word sentence: "THOSE BARBARIANS AMBUSH HEAVIER FIANCEES." These 5 words have something very unusual in common. What is it?

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The Sunday Conversation
8:00 am
Sun January 4, 2015

Attracted To Men, Pastor Feels Called To Marriage With A Woman

Allan and Leeanne Edwards are expecting a baby in July. They met at summer camp, but he was a "raging fundamentalist nerd" at the time and they didn't get together until years later.
Courtesy Allan and Leeanne Edwards

Originally published on Mon January 5, 2015 12:42 pm

In The Sunday Conversation, Weekend Edition Sunday brings listeners an unexpected side of the news by talking with someone personally affected by the stories making headlines.

Allan Edwards is the pastor of Kiski Valley Presbyterian Church in western Pennsylvania, a congregation of the Presbyterian Church in America. He's attracted to men, but he considers acting on that attraction a sin. Accordingly, Edwards has chosen not to act on it.

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Law
6:08 am
Sun January 4, 2015

New York Prepares For Slain Officer's Funeral

Originally published on Sun January 4, 2015 10:20 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Music Interviews
5:48 am
Sun January 4, 2015

Songs From The Obituaries Are 'The Afterneath'

Originally published on Sun January 4, 2015 11:21 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Author Interviews
5:48 am
Sun January 4, 2015

Humans On Display In 'Hall Of Small Mammals'

Originally published on Thu January 8, 2015 8:12 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Writer Thomas Pierce has included no penguins in his new short story collection. It's called "Hall of Small Mammals." But the mammals he does showcase, besides humans, of course, tend to be highly unusual - part prehistoric, part ahistoric, magical even.

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Food
7:40 am
Sun December 28, 2014

A Cuppa Matcha With Your Crickets? On The Menu In 2015

Originally published on Mon December 29, 2014 1:06 pm

It's time to set the table for 2015. What will be the next kale? Has the cupcake breathed its last?

We're headed for high times. As states legalize marijuana, cannabis comestibles are coming. Pot brownies — so 1960s — are joined by marijuana mac 'n' cheese and pot pesto. There's a new cooking show called Bong Appetit.

Another crushed leaf is this year's superdrink. Matcha is made from green tea and promises a calmer energy boost than Red Bull. The Japanese have been drinking it for centuries.

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Health Care
7:29 am
Sun December 28, 2014

Tennessee's Medicaid Deal Dodges A Partisan Fight

Gov. Bill Haslam announces his proposal to expand Medicaid in Tennessee on Dec. 15. Under the plan, the hospital association would pay the state's portion of the program.
Erik Schelzig AP

Originally published on Sun December 28, 2014 9:07 am

Tony Smith's disability check puts him over the income limit to receive standard Medicaid, but it's too little for him to qualify for a subsidy.

Sitting next to a federal health-care navigator at a Nashville, Tenn., clinic, he said he hopes lawmakers think of his plight and that of thousands of others when considering Medicaid expansion.

"I'm not looking for a handout," Smith says. "I'm just looking for some help ... because I need it."

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History
7:18 am
Sun December 28, 2014

Fleeing To Dismal Swamp, Slaves And Outcasts Found Freedom

Great Dismal Swamp, in Virginia and North Carolina, was once thought to be haunted. For generations of escaped slaves, says archaeologist Dan Sayers, the swamp was a haven.
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Originally published on Sun December 28, 2014 1:50 pm

Most Americans know about the Underground Railroad, the route that allowed Southern slaves to escape North. Some slaves found freedom by hiding closer to home, however — in Great Dismal Swamp.

The swamp is a vast wetland in southeastern Virginia and northeastern North Carolina. In George Washington's time, it was a million acres of trees, dark water, bears, bobcats, snakes and stinging insects. British settlers, who first arrived in 1607, believed the swamp was haunted.

By 1620, some of their slaves may have overcome that fear to find freedom there.

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