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Pandora's Box
11:16 am
Tue July 29, 2014

The Movement Against Hydraulic Fracturing In Colorado

Credit fractivist.blogspot.com

The oil and gas drilling practice known as hydraulic fracturing, or "fracking", is meeting resistance in communities across Colorado. In this episode of Pandora's Box, recorded at the Telluride Mountain Film Festival, co-host Joanie Trussel talks with Allison Wolff, producer of the film "Dear Governor Hickenlooper", a collection of documentary films providing new perspectives on fracking and clean energy through the eyes of scientists, entrepreneurs, artists and families.

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Library On The Go!
8:40 am
Tue July 29, 2014

Library On The Go! - July 27th, 2014

In this week's episode, Barbara reads "Thumbelina" by Hans Christian Anderson, adapted by Tom Roberts; and "The Seven Chinese Sisters" by Kathy Tucker.

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The Zine
9:00 am
Thu July 24, 2014

Oil and Gas Leasing Near Bluff, Utah

Credit Quentin Scouflaire / Creative Commons

The Bureau of Land Management recently initiated a process for leasing public land near Bluff, Utah for oil and gas development. KSJD's Tom Yoder talks with Josh Ewing, executive director of Friends of Cedar Mesa, about where these parcels are located, and why residents are concerned.

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The Zine
10:04 am
Wed July 23, 2014

Using Archaeology To Tackle Today's Problems

Credit Çatalhöyük / Creative Commons

Archaeology is a science that most of us consider as a way to perceive the distant past, with little application to today's problems. KSJD's Tom Yoder talks with Steve Wolverton, Associate Professor in Archaeology at the University of North Texas, who uses data from ancient and modern sources in an attempt to shed new light on contemporary environmental and social issues.

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Big Fat Farm Show
11:54 am
Tue July 22, 2014

A History Of Milk

Credit Beverley Goodwin / Creative Commons

In this episode of the Big Fat Farm Show, host Sarah Syverson talks with local chiropractor Bill Breitenbach about the history of milk production in the United States, and why modern milk production may not be the best for our health.

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Library On The Go!
1:07 pm
Mon July 21, 2014

Library On The Go! - July 20th, 2014

In this episode Barbara reads "Many Moons" by James Thurber and "The Patchwork Puppy" by Lillian Moore.

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The Zine
10:11 am
Mon July 21, 2014

Remembering The Mancos Times In The 1960s

Credit Sam Greene / Cortez Journal

The Mancos Times is one of the oldest newspapers in Montezuma County and for many years used a rare printing press to produce its papers. KSJD's Tom Yoder talks with Dick Patrick, who ran the Mancos Times in the 1960s and was the last person to operate the Cranston printing press, one of only three like it remaining in the country.

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KSJD
3:28 pm
Fri July 18, 2014

Interview with DJ Logic

Credit Matthew Ireland / Creative Commons

KSJD's Cannonball, host of Lame Town Review, talks with this year's Telluride Jazz Festival Artist-at-Large DJ Logic about how he incorporates his turntables into almost any musical combo, how he chooses vinyl for his shows, and what he is looking forward to at the 2014 Telluride Jazz Fest.

Donate to KSJD before July 22nd and you will be entered to win a prize package to the Telluride Jazz Festival, including weekend passes and lodging. Click HERE for more information.

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The Zine
9:34 am
Fri July 18, 2014

Local Author Bethany Turner

Credit Bethany Turner

Writing fiction using real-life celebrities as primary characters can be tricky, but fun. In this Zine interview, KSJD's Tom Yoder talks with local author Bethany Turner who chooses to unpack her obsession with pop culture in a series of books featuring Abigail Phelps, a fictional heroine who interacts with today's most recognizable stars.

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The Abigail Phelps website can be found here: www.abbyphelps.com

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The Zine
9:10 am
Thu July 17, 2014

A New Approach To Chaco Canyon

Credit Sam Wise / Creative Commons

The prehistory of Chaco Canyon has largely been interpreted using archaeological evidence that has lead to explanations of Chaco Canyon as a destination for Mesoamerican traders, a hub in a centralized redistribution system, or as a destination for pilgrims within a ritualized landscape. KSJD's Tom Yoder talks with Dr. John Ware, an anthropologist and archaeologist who believes that the key to explaining Chaco canyon may lie in deciphering differences and similarities among the living descendants of Chaco: the historic Pueblo peoples of Arizona and New Mexico.

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