water

Amanda Wilson / Creative Commons

With McPhee Reservoir rising about a half-foot a day, reservoir managers are planning a "boating spill" starting Thursday or Friday, June 5th or 6th.

Al_HikesAZ / Creative Commons

A long-held dream of environmental activists gained new legitimacy in Sunday’s New York Times.

Dolores River Boating Advocates

Boaters can now mark their calendars for the first weekend in June to take a trip down the Lower Dolores River.

Aftab Uzzaman / Creative Commons

Kevin Fedarko is a river guide and author who wrote about a historic boating speed run through the Grand Canyon in his book "The Emerald Mile". In this second part of his interview with Fedarko, River Radio host Sam Carter talks with the author about his views on writing about his outdoor adventures, and the current state of the Grand Canyon.

Anita Ritenour / Creative Commons

Kevin Fedarko is a river guide and author who wrote about a historic boating speed run through the Grand Canyon in his book "The Emerald Mile". In the first of a two-part interview, River Radio host Sam Carter talked with Fedarko about the book and how it shaped his views of the Grand Canyon, and his latest project to walk the length of the canyon.


The History of the McElmo Creek Flume

May 9, 2016
Colorado Preservation, Inc.

The McElmo Creek Flume is a unique piece of irrigation infrastructure that illustrates how water delivery systems were critical in the early days of Cortez history. KSJD's Tom Yoder sat down with Linda Towle, chairwoman of the Cortez Historic Preservation Board, to talk about efforts being made to restore the McElmo Creek Flume and protect it as a historical resource.

Amanda Wilson / Creative Commons

The big question on many boater's minds is if there will be a spill into the Lower Dolores River from McPhee Reservoir this spring that would allow for recreational flows. River Radio host Sam Carter talks with Vern Harrell, manager at the Bureau of Reclamation, about the prospect for a boating spill this spring, and the factors that go into deciding if a spill is appropriate given the various demands on the water in the Dolores River.


  • Warm weather is shrinking area snowpack, but plenty remains for irrigation.
  • Spring weather also means weeds, a growing and perennial problem for Montezuma County.

  • Communities in the Animas and San Juan River watersheds preparing for dirtier water in coming weeks as snow melt stirs up toxic metals from last year's Gold King Mine waste spill.

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