water

Austin Cope

The gravel road that leads to the Ute Mountain Ute Tribe Farm and Ranch Enterprise winds through 11 miles of desert grass and dry brush.


Eric Whyte

The Ute Mountain Ute Tribe operates a large farm and ranch on its lands in Southwestern Colorado. It grows crops like alfalfa and artisan corn, and raises over 600 head of cattle. The Tribe went through a long settlement process to obtain the water rights to operate the enterprise.  But just because it has the farm and the rights to the water doesn’t mean they can use as much as they want.


Doc Searls / Creative Commons

The Ute Mountain Ute Tribe and other irrigators in Montezuma and Dolores Counties will receive about 20 percent less water from McPhee Reservoir this year, according to Dolores Water Conservancy District General Manager Mike Preston.

Eric Tanner / Dolores Water Conservancy District

As spring begins in the Four Corners, the Dolores Water Conservancy continues to monitor weather and snowpack in the San Juan Mountains to try to predict how much water will make it into McPhee Reservoir this summer. KSJD's Austin Cope spoke with DWCD General Manager Mike Preston to get an update on current forecasts and conditions. Click below to listen.

If Colorado irrigation water law has you confused, you’re likely not alone-- it can be incredibly complex.  On this episode of the Big Fat Farm Show, KSJD’s Kellie Pettyjohn will help you work through it.

Pages