Music

I bet you don't think of classical works when you think of the catch-all phrase "Latin music." But this episode of Alt.Latino is here to tell you that you should.

We invited our colleague Tom Huizenga to sit in this week for Jasmine Garsd while she takes a well-deserved vacation. Tom writes NPR Music's Deceptive Cadence blog about all things classical, and on this episode of Alt.Latino, he offers a concise beginner's overview of what and whom you should hear in classical music from Latin America.

Latin Roots: Gepe

7 hours ago

Gepe is the stage name for Chilean singer-songwriter and multi-instrumentalist Daniel Riveros, who's been described as the "guru of indie folk" for his driving indie pop involving elements of Andean folk. Riveros attributes the creativity in the Chilean indie-music scene to an "anything goes" attitude of experimentation that permeates the first post-dictatorship generation in his home country.

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The scene was electric at the B.B. King Blues Club in Times Square as Bunny Wailer, 69 years old, took the stage before a capacity crowd.

Born Neville Livingston, Bunny is the last living original member of the legendary reggae group The Wailers, which he founded along with Peter Tosh and Bob Marley in the early 1960s.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Corinne Bailey Rae has traveled great distances in her music. The UK singer's self-titled debut album came out 10 years ago; all sunshiny pop, it was a huge hit. Her second album, The Sea took an emotional turn, coming shortly after her husband of seven years died suddenly. Rae was 29.

One of the world's best-known and best-loved classical musicians has joined the ranks of artists refusing to perform in North Carolina. Violinist Itzhak Perlman canceled an appearance scheduled for Wednesday with the North Carolina Symphony in Raleigh to protest HB2, the controversial North Carolina law limiting civil rights protections for LGBT people.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

At White House state dinners, it's customary for a president to nod to the strengths and contributions of guest countries. And when hosting Nordic nations on Friday, President Obama paid tribute to a particular Finnish export.

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