Weekend Edition Sunday on KSJD

Weekend Edition Sunday premiered on January 18, 1987, and was the last of NPR's major newsmagazines to hit the air. Since then, Weekend Edition Sunday has covered newsmakers, artists, scientists, politicans, musicians, writers, thinkers, theologians and all manner of news events. Originally hosted by Susan Stamberg, the show has been anchored by Liane Hansen since 1989. Senior News Analyst Daniel Schorr and Puzzlemaster Will Shortz have been with the program from the beginning, and a wide variety of commentators and essayists help round out the weekly offerings: humorist Andy Borowitz slings satirical arrows at big-shots, celebrities, and politicans of all stripes; Diane Roberts takes a sometimes hilarious, sometimes poignant view of life in the South; and transplanted Brit Tim Brookes offers his impressions of life on these shores. For more information, please go to: http://www.npr.org/templates/rundowns/rundown.php?prgId=10 

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Music
5:35 am
Sun May 31, 2015

On Algiers' Debut Album, Southern Boys Find A Common Cause

Algiers' self-titled debut album is out June 2.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun May 31, 2015 10:12 am

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The Salt
5:35 am
Sun May 31, 2015

At World's Fair In Italy, The Future Of Food Is On The Table

Carlo Ratti of MIT designed this "supermarket of the future" exhibit. If you move a hand close to a product, a digital display lights up, providing information on origin, nutritional value and carbon footprint.
Courtesy of COOP Italia

Originally published on Tue June 2, 2015 3:57 pm

For the next six months, Italy is hosting a dinner party — and the entire world is invited to attend.

The event, called Expo Milano 2015, is the latest World's Fair. This year's theme is "feeding the planet, energy for life." The global population is projected to pass 9 billion by 2050, and Expo organizers want to start a global conversation now about sustainability, biodiversity and food security.

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National Security
7:39 am
Sun May 24, 2015

At Dover Air Force Base, Bringing Home The Fallen With Grief And Joy

A carry team at Dover Air Force Base trains on the proper protocol for a dignified transfer.
Ariel Zambelich NPR

Originally published on Sun May 24, 2015 11:44 am

There is a grim kind of math that comes with war.

Most of the troops who died during the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan were flown to Dover Air Force base in Delaware. And for most of the wars, those dignified transfers were off limits to the press. That changed in 2009, when President Obama lifted the media ban and paid a visit to Dover himself.

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Latin America
6:38 am
Sun May 24, 2015

Accusations Pile Up Against Panama's Former President

Panama's former President Ricardo Martinelli answers questions during an interview at a hotel in Guatemala City in January.
Moises Castillo AP

Originally published on Tue May 26, 2015 8:40 am

Former Panamanian President Ricardo Martinelli wasn't always rich.

One of Central America's richest and most eccentric former politicians, Martinelli started off as a credit officer at Citibank in Panama. He bought one business, then another. Among his holdings is the country's largest supermarket chain, Super 99, known for bargain prices and catchy jingles.

But while his jingles may get Panamanian's hips moving, Martinelli's alleged pilfering and profiteering make their blood boil.

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The Sunday Conversation
6:02 am
Sun May 24, 2015

'How Could You Not Know You Were Pregnant?'

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sun May 24, 2015 9:15 am

Weekend Edition Sunday host Rachel Martin brings listeners an unexpected side of the news by talking with someone personally affected by the stories making headlines.

Brittany Ohman is a 41-year-old mother of two and a licensed social worker in Idaho Falls, Idaho. Ohman and NPR's Rachel Martin grew up together and were good friends through high school. When they were seniors, Ohman got pregnant and no one knew. She didn't even know — and she knows that sounds crazy. She has heard the question for years.

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Around the Nation
5:31 am
Sun May 24, 2015

Colorado's Free IUD Program Set To End In July

Originally published on Sun May 24, 2015 9:15 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Europe
5:31 am
Sun May 24, 2015

To Build Up Its Historical Image, Macedonia Is Going Baroque

A statue of Olympias, mother of Alexander the Great, depicts her as pregnant with her famous son. It's part of a monument to Alexander's family in Skopje, the Macedonian capital.
Joanna Kakissis NPR

Originally published on Sun May 24, 2015 1:23 pm

Martin Panovski used to like hanging out in the center of his hometown, Skopje, the capital of Macedonia, a tiny Balkan nation that was, until 1991, part of Yugoslavia. Skopje's an old city, with complex, multi-ethnic layers of Roman, Byzantine and Ottoman history.

"Even the communist era produced some interesting contemporary architecture," says Panovski, an architect in hip eyeglasses.

The nationalist government of prime minister Nikola Gruevski did not agree. "The capital did not look European," says Nikola Zezov, a historian and Gruevski supporter. "It looked boring."

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Sports
5:31 am
Sun May 24, 2015

NFL Aims To Spice Up Games With Tweak To Extra Point Rules

Originally published on Sun May 24, 2015 9:15 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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The Salt
7:00 am
Sun May 17, 2015

South Carolina Distiller Promises To Make Kentucky Liquor Quicker

Jars of Terressentia bourbon wait for final production. Terressentia uses a process to artificially "age" its bourbon in a few hours, forgoing traditional aging, which takes years.
Courtesy of Terressentia

Originally published on Mon May 18, 2015 11:04 am

Kentucky bourbon is in high demand these days. Sales and production of the whiskey have surged in recent years.

The demand has created a problem: a shortage of barrels. Bourbon is typically aged for several years in wooden casks.

But one company has found a work-around. It's come up with a chemical process that ages bourbon not in years — but in hours. The innovation is unsettling an industry that is long-soaked in history and tradition.

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Deceptive Cadence
6:49 am
Sun May 17, 2015

After Thaw, Minnesota Orchestra Returns To Cuba

The Minnesota Orchestra under the direction of conductor Osmo Vanska (center) performs during a concert at the Cuban National Theater in Havana on Friday.
Yamil Lage AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun May 17, 2015 8:44 am

The Minnesota Orchestra plays Havana this weekend. It's the first professional U.S. orchestra to perform in Cuba since the United States and the island nation began the process of normalization last December. For the musicians, this trip is about healing — both diplomatically and for themselves.

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