Weekend Edition Sunday on KSJD

Weekend Edition Sunday premiered on January 18, 1987, and was the last of NPR's major newsmagazines to hit the air. Since then, Weekend Edition Sunday has covered newsmakers, artists, scientists, politicans, musicians, writers, thinkers, theologians and all manner of news events. Originally hosted by Susan Stamberg, the show has been anchored by Liane Hansen since 1989. Senior News Analyst Daniel Schorr and Puzzlemaster Will Shortz have been with the program from the beginning, and a wide variety of commentators and essayists help round out the weekly offerings: humorist Andy Borowitz slings satirical arrows at big-shots, celebrities, and politicans of all stripes; Diane Roberts takes a sometimes hilarious, sometimes poignant view of life in the South; and transplanted Brit Tim Brookes offers his impressions of life on these shores. For more information, please go to: http://www.npr.org/templates/rundowns/rundown.php?prgId=10 

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Around the Nation
5:38 am
Sun December 7, 2014

'Rolling Stone' 'Blurred The Lines' In Its Campus Rape Story

Originally published on Sun December 7, 2014 11:57 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Author Interviews
5:38 am
Sun December 7, 2014

Staff Favorite: An Interview With Poet Stephen Dunn

Originally published on Sun December 7, 2014 10:25 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Science
5:38 am
Sun December 7, 2014

Stephen Hawking Gets A Voice Upgrade

Originally published on Sun December 7, 2014 10:25 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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The sound of Stephen Hawking's voice is iconic.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

STEPHEN HAWKING: Where did we come from? How did the universe come into being?

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Middle East
5:38 am
Sun December 7, 2014

Mideast Conflicts Converge In Once-Quiet Turkish City

Originally published on Sun December 7, 2014 10:25 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Parallels
10:52 am
Sun November 30, 2014

Uruguay Tries To Tame A 'Monster' Called Cannabis

Outgoing Uruguay President Jose Mujica's face illustrates a T-shirt supporting his new law legalizing marijuana. Uruguay's citizens are voting for Mujica's replacement on Sunday, and the expected winner is a candidate from his party.
Matilde Campodonico AP

Originally published on Mon December 1, 2014 10:52 am

To gauge international interest in Uruguay's legal cannabis market, spend just a few minutes at a small marijuana shop called Urugrow in Uruguay's capital, Montevideo.

In a period of about 10 minutes, owner Juan Manuel Varela gets a call from Brazil. A man from Canada shows up to see what the market would be for his company, which sells child-safe packaging for marijuana products. Shortly after, two American travelers stop by looking to score weed.

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Music Interviews
6:07 am
Sun November 30, 2014

NPR Staffers Pick Their Favorite Music Interviews

Originally published on Sun November 30, 2014 10:44 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Africa
6:07 am
Sun November 30, 2014

In Liberia, Ebola Shifts From Cities To Villages

Originally published on Sun November 30, 2014 10:44 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Race
6:07 am
Sun November 30, 2014

Feelings On Ferguson Reflect Deep Racial Divide

Originally published on Sun November 30, 2014 10:44 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Photography
6:07 am
Sun November 30, 2014

First Rule In iPhone Photography: Edit, Edit, Edit

Originally published on Sun November 30, 2014 10:44 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Politics
10:02 am
Sun November 23, 2014

Families Feel Sidelined As U.S. Reviews Hostage Policy

Journalist James Foley was killed by the so-called Islamic State in August of this year. His mother, Diane Foley, says the U.S. government never reached out to tell her that her son was dead.
Marko Drobnjakovic AP

First, there was James Foley. Then Steven Sotloff. Finally, Abdul Rahman Kassig, also known as Peter Kassig. All three were American hostages, brutally murdered by the so-called Islamic State.

This past week the White House confirmed that it's conducting a review of its hostage policy, but in a press conference, White House spokesman Josh Earnest says the United States will not change its policy on ransoms: America does not pay them.

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