Weekend Edition Sunday on KSJD

Weekend Edition Sunday premiered on January 18, 1987, and was the last of NPR's major newsmagazines to hit the air. Since then, Weekend Edition Sunday has covered newsmakers, artists, scientists, politicans, musicians, writers, thinkers, theologians and all manner of news events. Originally hosted by Susan Stamberg, the show has been anchored by Liane Hansen since 1989. Senior News Analyst Daniel Schorr and Puzzlemaster Will Shortz have been with the program from the beginning, and a wide variety of commentators and essayists help round out the weekly offerings: humorist Andy Borowitz slings satirical arrows at big-shots, celebrities, and politicans of all stripes; Diane Roberts takes a sometimes hilarious, sometimes poignant view of life in the South; and transplanted Brit Tim Brookes offers his impressions of life on these shores. For more information, please go to: http://www.npr.org/templates/rundowns/rundown.php?prgId=10 

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Parallels
9:00 am
Sun June 28, 2015

For Americans Seeking Affordable Degrees, German Schools Beckon

Berlin's Humboldt University — named for its founder, the 19th century philosopher and linguist Wilhelm von Humboldt, and his brother, naturalist Alexander von Humboldt, pictured here — is one of several German universities attracting U.S. students. More than 4,000 Americans are studying in German universities.
Markus Schreiber AP

Originally published on Mon June 29, 2015 12:34 pm

Looking to escape the staggering costs of a university education in the United States? You are not alone. And German education officials say a growing number of Americans are heading to the land of beer and bratwurst to get one.

At last count, there were 4,300 Americans studying at German universities, with more than half pursuing degrees, says Ulrich Grothus, deputy secretary general of the German Academic Exchange Service.

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Author Interviews
8:00 am
Sun June 28, 2015

Two Years After Deadly Wildfire, Are There Lessons In The Ashes?

An aerial view shows the Yarnell Hill fire burning June 29, 2013 near the town of Yarnell, Ariz. The next day, 19 firefighters died battling the blaze.
Arizona State Forestry Division Getty Images

Two years ago, a wildfire was raging in the foothills of North Arizona. The Granite Mountain Hotshots, a team of elite firefighters from Prescott, Ariz., were on the ground, battling the blaze.

Then the weather and the winds shifted, and the two-day-old Yarnell Hill Fire changed course. The commander had a huge decision to make: stay on safe ground, or try to cut off the blaze?

He made the call — and before the day was over, 19 hotshot firefighters were dead. It was one of the deadliest incidents for wildland firefighters in U.S. history.

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StoryCorps
6:32 am
Sun June 28, 2015

Long Before Same-Sex Marriage, 'Adopted Son' Could Mean 'Life Partner'

Civil rights leader Bayard Rustin, left, and Walter Naegle, right, became partners in the 1970s and were together until Rustin's death. Decades before gay marriage was an option, Rustin adopted Naegle to lend legal protection to their relationship.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Sun June 28, 2015 7:40 am

StoryCorps' OutLoud initiative records stories from the LGBTQ community.

As of this Friday, same-sex marriage is legal in all 50 states — thanks to a historic Supreme Court decision.

In the 1970s, this week's ruling on marriage equality was unimaginable. But many gay couples, knowing marriage was impossible, still wanted legal protection for their unions.

Iconic civil rights activist Bayard Rustin and his partner, Walter Naegle, were one such couple. The two men fell in love and were together for many years.

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NPR Story
6:17 am
Sun June 28, 2015

2 Brothers And A Team Of Mules Tackle The Historic Oregon Trail

The Oregon Trail looms large in the American imagination. But journalist Rinker Buck and his brother Nick set out to see what the experience was really like — miseries and all.
Albert Bierstadt Public Domain

Originally published on Sun June 28, 2015 7:40 am

Two 21st-century guys, a replica 19th-century wagon, some mules and a resolution: to re-live the Oregon Trail today.

Rivers, mountains, cliffs, runaway mules, cars and trucks, bad weather ... What could possibly go wrong?

Journalist Rinker Buck wanted to find out. He and his brother Nick hitched a covered wagon to mules and set off to retrace what's left of the westward path traveled by thousands of 19th-century pioneers.

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U.S.
5:51 am
Sun June 28, 2015

Part Of The Landscape For Decades, Pumpjacks Remain Essential In Shale Fields

Originally published on Sun June 28, 2015 7:40 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Around the Nation
1:48 pm
Sun June 21, 2015

Emanuel AME Church In Charleston Opens Its Doors

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This morning, the doors at the historic black Emanuel AME Church in Charleston, S.C.arolina opened once again after nine people were killed there earlier this week. The congregation was trying to move on.

(SOUNDBITE OF CHURCH SERVICE)

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Around the Nation
8:06 am
Sun June 21, 2015

Charleston Church Holds Emotional Services Days After Shootings

Originally published on Sun June 21, 2015 1:48 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This morning, the doors at the historic black Emanuel AME Church in Charleston, S.C., are open once again and a service is underway.

(SOUNDBITE OF CHURCH SERVICE)

MARTIN: Elder John Gillison had this to say.

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Parallels
7:43 am
Sun June 21, 2015

Israel Bets On Recycled Water To Meet Its Growing Thirst

Farmer Efi Cohen inspects almond trees on a kibbutz south of Jerusalem. The Israeli government says it's safe to use treated sewage water to irrigate tree fruit, but not all crops.
Emily Harris NPR

Originally published on Sun June 21, 2015 8:20 pm

Recycling sewage water has helped free Israel, a desert country, from depending on rain.

Treated sewage water provides close to a quarter of Israel's demand for water, right behind desalination, the other major process that has eased Israel's fear of drought.

But making that water — from toilets, showers, and factories — clean enough to use is challenging.

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Commentary
7:06 am
Sun June 21, 2015

A Father, A Daughter And A Continent Between Them

Jon Kalish with his daughter Meleia, at around 6 months old, in Oakland, Calif. Kalish lived in New York, and had to travel across the country to visit his young daughter.
Courtesy Jon Kalish

Originally published on Mon June 22, 2015 6:27 am

Click the audio link above to hear more messages from Meleia, as well as interviews with her stepfather, a teacher and a classmate.


There I am in Sears on Long Island with my baby daughter Meleia and her mom. We're buying baby things, and I keep thinking to myself, "I don't believe this. I just don't believe this."

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Middle East
6:24 am
Sun June 21, 2015

For A British Man, Fighting ISIS Was Simply The Right Thing To Do

Seen here in an undated photograph, Macer Gifford — an alias he uses to protect his family — left his job as a financial trader in London to fight ISIS in Syria.
Courtesy of Macer Gifford

Originally published on Sun June 21, 2015 1:48 pm

We have heard about how ISIS is recruiting foreign fighters to join its ranks. But it's happening on the other side as well.

Just last week, a Massachusetts man who died fighting against ISIS in Syria was laid to rest.

Last year, a British man who calls himself Macer Gifford left his job as a financial trader in London and went to join the Kurds and fight the self-declared Islamic State in Syria.

Gifford spoke on the condition that NPR not reveal his real name, because he fears for the safety of his family in the UK.

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