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RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Malaysia and North Korea are wrangling over whether a man who died at the Kuala Lumpur airport last week is indeed Kim Jong Nam, the estranged half-brother of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un.

Among the many countries trying to figure out what to make of it is North Korea's neighbor and sole ally, China.

Officially, China has said little except that it is closely monitoring the situation. But in China, Kim Jong Nam's apparent assassination has triggered a debate about what it means and how to respond.

The Environmental Protection Agency has a pretty simple mission in principle: to protect human health and the environment. It's a popular purpose too. Nearly three out of four U.S. adults believe the country "should do whatever it takes to protect the environment," according to a 2016 survey by the Pew Research Center.

Political support for the EPA, though, is less effusive.

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RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Congressman Elijah Cummings has questions, questions about President Trump's administration.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It is Cummings' job to ask. He is the top Democrat on the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. Monopoly, the board game, is getting a revamp. Makers of the game want to pick the next generation of game pieces, you know, the car, the battleship, the top hat.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Keep it upside down for luck.

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