Morning Edition

For more than two decades, NPR's Morning Edition has prepared listeners for the day ahead with two hours of up-to-the-minute news, background analysis, commentary, and coverage of arts and sports. With nearly 13 million listeners, Morning Edition draws public radio's largest audience. One of the most respected news magazines in the world, Morning Edition airs Monday through Friday on more than 600 NPR stations across the United States, and around the globe on NPR's international services. For more information or to listen to an episode you missed, please visit the Morning Edition information page

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Remembrances
5:37 am
Wed April 29, 2015

Jack Ely, Known For 'Louie Louie,' Dies At 71

Originally published on Wed April 29, 2015 6:51 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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(SOUNDBITE OF THE KINGSMEN SONG, "LOUIE LOUIE")

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NPR Story
3:03 am
Wed April 29, 2015

4 Americans Were Hiking In Nepal When Quake Hit

Originally published on Wed April 29, 2015 6:51 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Story
3:03 am
Wed April 29, 2015

High Court Hears Challenge To 4 States' Gay-Marriage Ban

Originally published on Wed April 29, 2015 6:51 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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3:03 am
Wed April 29, 2015

Baltimore Is Not Ferguson. Here's What It Really Is

A man makes a heart shape with his hands during a peaceful protest near the CVS pharmacy that was set on fire on Monday in Baltimore.
Andrew Burton Getty Images

Originally published on Wed April 29, 2015 12:19 pm

This week's Baltimore riot could not have happened to a nicer city.

Baltimore residents welcome strangers and even call them "hon." They sit on benches painted with the slogan "The Greatest City in America."

Baltimore is also where people looted stores and burned cars Monday night. They did it when a man died a week after being arrested.

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NPR Story
3:03 am
Wed April 29, 2015

Nepalis In Worst-Hit Areas Suffer Through Devastating Destruction

Originally published on Wed April 29, 2015 6:51 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Around the Nation
3:03 am
Wed April 29, 2015

Police In Baltimore Clear Defiant Crowds

Originally published on Wed April 29, 2015 6:51 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Business
4:42 am
Tue April 28, 2015

For A Resume, Type Font Matters

Originally published on Tue April 28, 2015 2:06 pm

Before you even get your foot in the door of your next job, your resume can say a lot about you — starting with typeface.

"Using Times New Roman is the typeface equivalent of wearing sweatpants to an interview," Bloomberg says in an article in which it turns to typography experts to ask which typefaces work and which don't.

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Around the Nation
4:24 am
Tue April 28, 2015

Charred 'Easy Mac' Forces Iowa Capitol To Evacuate

Originally published on Tue April 28, 2015 6:09 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Law
4:03 am
Tue April 28, 2015

Defense Team Urges Jury To Send Boston Bomber To Prison For Life

Originally published on Tue April 28, 2015 11:46 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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In a few words, here is the defense for the Boston Marathon bomber. He was drawn into the deadly plot by his older brother.

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Food
3:59 am
Tue April 28, 2015

Tyson Foods To Stop Giving Chickens Antibiotics Used By Humans

Tyson Foods says it has already reduced its use of human-use antibiotics by 80 percent over the past four years. Here, Tyson frozen chicken on display at Piazza's market in Palo Alto, Calif., in 2010.
Paul Sakuma AP

Originally published on Tue April 28, 2015 3:07 pm

Tyson Foods, the country's biggest poultry producer, is promising to stop feeding its chickens any antibiotics that are used in human medicine.

It's the most dramatic sign so far of a major shift by the poultry industry. The speed with which chicken producers have turned away from antibiotics, in fact, has surprised some of the industry's longtime critics.

For decades, the farmers who raise chickens, pigs and cattle have used antibiotics as part of a formula for growing more animals, and growing them more cheaply.

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