All Things Considered

At 5 p.m. EDT on May 3, 1971, the first edition of All Things Considered went on the air. In the more than three decades since, almost everything about the program has changed -- the hosts and producers, the length of the program, the equipment used, even the audience. But one thing remains the same: the determination to get the day's big stories on the air, and to bring them alive through sound and voice. For one hour every weekday on KSJD, All Things Considered hosts Robert Siegel, Michele Norris and Melissa Block present the program's trademark mix of news, interviews, commentaries, reviews and offbeat features. For more information, or listen to an episode you missed, please visit the All Things Considered information page.

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Kinder Eggs are coming to America.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

UNIDENTIFIED PERSON: Wee.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: Kinder Surprise from Ferrero.

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British police say they've made immense progress in their investigation into Monday night's suicide bombing in Manchester. They say they've captured a large part of a terror network operating in the city. Nine people are now in custody.

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Singer and multi-instrumentalist Krystle Warren has been compared to artists like Tracy Chapman and Nina Simone. The latter comparison is particularly intriguing: Not only does Warren share that icon's talent for evocative storytelling, but she also lives in France, as Simone once did.

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