All Things Considered

At 5 p.m. EDT on May 3, 1971, the first edition of All Things Considered went on the air. In the more than three decades since, almost everything about the program has changed -- the hosts and producers, the length of the program, the equipment used, even the audience. But one thing remains the same: the determination to get the day's big stories on the air, and to bring them alive through sound and voice. For one hour every weekday on KSJD, All Things Considered hosts Robert Siegel, Michele Norris and Melissa Block present the program's trademark mix of news, interviews, commentaries, reviews and offbeat features. For more information, or listen to an episode you missed, please visit the All Things Considered information page.

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As the #MeToo movement has spread, more and more women - and some men - have been coming forward from more and more workplaces and other institutions to share their stories and to demand change.

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And finally today, we are going to hear more about the creative life of Robin Williams. He is the subject of a new HBO documentary airing tomorrow night called "Robin Williams: Come Inside My Mind."

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Deborah Watts was just a toddler in 1955 when her 14-year-old cousin Emmett Till was kidnapped, viciously beaten and murdered after a white woman accused him of whistling and making advances toward her. Watts' aunt, Mamie Till-Mobley, famously made the decision to hold an open-casket funeral for her son, showcasing the brutal violence of white supremacy to the rest of the world. The injustice of Till's death — two white men were acquitted of his murder — became a powerful testimony for the Civil Rights Movement.

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