Ag Markets & More

Tuesday and Thursday mornings at 5:45am and 7:45am
  • Hosted by Jeff Pope, Bob Bragg
  • Local Host Jeff Pope

Ag Markets & More brings you a twice-weekly report on issues that affect agriculture and its role in shaping local, national, and global economies.

Are Perennial Grains Coming Our Way?

Apr 6, 2017

Researchers at the Land Institute, near Salina, Kansas, have worked since 2003 to develop a perennial grain crop that will replace some of the annual wheat grown around the world.  They have recently released Kernza®, an improved variety of intermediate wheatgrass that is being used, along with wheat flower, in baked goods, used alone in quick breads such as pancakes and muffins, or served as a pilaf. 

Cattle Wearing Fitbits?

Apr 4, 2017
NRCS

Young cattle placed into feedlots are at risk for developing respiratory diseases that affect weight gain and may even result in death.  Pen riders check cattle frequently for signs of illness, but some calves are hard to diagnose until they are very sick.  Research shows promise that using activity trackers similar to the popular Fitbit, used by fitness buffs, can help to identify calves that are becoming sick earlier in the progression of diseases.

Healthy Soils Tie Up CO2

Mar 21, 2017
Tim Mc Cabe / NRCS

We often only consider soil health when we talk about growing food, but some scientists believe that healthy soils are also required to tie up CO2, which has been implicated in our warming climate.  The article, "Soil and Human Security in the 21st Century," in the May 2015 issue of Science Magazine, makes the case that soil is one of Earth's most valuable commodities, and that we must develop strategies to protect this resource. 

35th Ag Expo Opens

Mar 16, 2017
Bob Bragg

Jeff and Bob discuss a brief history of the Four States Ag Expo and hemp production in southwest Colorado.

Jeff Vanuga / NRCS

Grassland fires that started March 6th, in northeast Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma and Texas, resulting in the deaths of several  people, thousands of head of livestock were killed, and property on over 1.2 million acres was destroyed.  Favorable growing conditions for grass last fall, followed by recent warm, dry weather, set the stage for the disasters, when strong winds drove flames for miles across the prairies. 

 

 

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