Joel Rose

Joel Rose is a National Desk reporter based at NPR's New York Bureau.

Since joining NPR in 2011, Rose has covered the political, economic, and cultural life of the nation's biggest city. He's reported on the rise of the Occupy Wall Street movement, the fall of the compact disc, and the fast-changing fortunes of New York's elected officials. He's also contributed to NPR's coverage of the Trayvon Martin shooting in Florida, and the Jerry Sandusky child sex-abuse scandal in Pennsylvania.

When pressing news doesn't keep him busy, Rose likes to report on the collision of the Internet and the entertainment industries, and to profile obscure musicians who should be more famous.

Rose has held a long list of jobs in public radio. Before coming to NPR, he spent ten years in Philadelphia, six of them as a reporter at NPR Member Station WHYY. He's also worked as a producer at KQED in San Francisco and American Routes in New Orleans. His writing has appeared in the Philadelphia Inquirer, GOOD Magazine, and the Philadelphia Independent.

His radio reporting has won numerous awards, including a Golden Reel from the National Association of Community Broadcasters for his story about the unlikely comeback of soul singer Howard Tate.

Rose has a bachelor's degree in history and music from Brown University, where he got his start in radio as an overnight jazz DJ at the college station.

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U.S.
3:57 pm
Sun June 28, 2015

Funerals And The Future Of The Confederate Flag

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Animals
2:55 pm
Fri June 19, 2015

Ivory Crushed In Times Square To Raise Awareness Of Wildlife Trafficking

Originally published on Fri June 19, 2015 6:13 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

One ton of ivory - that's how much federal officials crushed today in New York's Times Square. The goal is to raise awareness about the illegal ivory trade and the elephant poaching that feeds it. NPR's Joel Rose reports.

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Music News
3:14 pm
Tue June 9, 2015

The Man Before The Guitar: Remembering Les Paul At 100

Les Paul's career as a guitarist and innovator led him to play jazz, pop and country with other legendary musicians for decades.
Courtesy of the Les Paul Foundation

Originally published on Tue June 9, 2015 4:57 pm

Say the name "Les Paul" to anybody born after 1960, and they'll probably think you're talking about an electric guitar. But the musician and inventor, who was born 100 years ago Tuesday, was also an accomplished jazz guitarist. Paul was never happier than when playing for a live audience.

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Sports
6:00 am
Sat June 6, 2015

American Pharoah Makes A Run At History

Kentucky Derby and Preakness Stakes winner American Pharoah plays with hot walker Juan Ramirez during a bath Friday at Belmont Park.
Julie Jacobson AP

Originally published on Sat June 6, 2015 10:44 am

The Triple Crown is one of the most difficult tests in sports: Three horse races over the course of just five weeks, culminating with the Belmont Stakes Saturday in Elmont, N.Y.

American Pharoah is favored to win, which would make him the first horse to capture the Triple Crown in 37 years. But his rivals have a key advantage: They've had extra time to rest, and that's led to some grumbling inside the sport.

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U.S.
4:45 pm
Thu June 4, 2015

NYPD's Union Rift Confronted By A Wider Shift In Leadership Style

NYPD veteran Brian Fusco speaks to press outside the 72nd Precinct in the Brooklyn borough on Jan. 20. Fusco is running for president of the state's Patrolman's Benevolent Association in the upcoming election, against incumbent Patrick Lynch, who has been an outspoken critic of New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio.
Mike Segar Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu June 4, 2015 6:50 pm

Police departments across the country are facing tough questions after a series of high-profile confrontations with civilians in Ferguson, South Carolina and Baltimore.

Now similar tensions are playing out inside some of the biggest police unions. In New York, one high-profile union president faces an electoral challenge for the first time in a decade.

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The Salt
3:48 pm
Fri May 22, 2015

In New Jersey, A Beef Over Pork Roll Sparks Rival Festivals

What is pork roll? As one fan puts it, "It's like Spam meets bacon." This sandwich is one of many ways to eat the processed meat, a largely unsung specialty of New Jersey.
via Wikimedia

Originally published on Sat May 23, 2015 9:49 am

Try to order "pork roll" in most of the country and you'll probably get a blank stare. But in New Jersey, pork roll is a staple at diners, restaurants and food trucks from Cape May to the Meadowlands. And this unsung meat product is now the star of not one, but two competing festivals on Saturday in Trenton.

To the untrained eye, pork roll looks like Canadian bacon. But New Jersey residents know better.

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Around the Nation
4:58 pm
Fri May 15, 2015

Amtrak Engineer Said Train May Have Been Struck Before Derailment

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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Architecture
3:46 pm
Tue May 12, 2015

Whitney Museum's New Building Opens Doors (And Walls) To Outside World

The new building's window-lined hallways are in stark contrast to the brutalist design of the Whitney's former home.
Nic Lehoux Courtesy of the Whitney Museum of American Art

Originally published on Wed May 13, 2015 3:18 pm

The Whitney Museum of American Art has never stayed in one place for long. It has had four different homes in its 84-year history — the latest a $422 million glass-and-steel construction that recently opened in Manhattan's Meatpacking District — and each of those homes speaks to a particular moment in the evolution of American art and museum culture.

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Music News
1:46 am
Thu May 7, 2015

Songwriters And Streaming Services Battle Over Decades-Old Decree

Neil Portnow (left), president and CEO of The Recording Academy, talks with Lee Thomas Miller, head of the Nashville Songwriters Association International, at a music licensing hearing in 2014.
Paul Morigi WireImage for NARAS

Originally published on Thu May 7, 2015 12:16 pm

Music streaming services like Spotify and Pandora continue to grow more popular with music fans — but not with musicians, who complain they used to earn more in royalties from CD sales and music downloads. Songwriters say they've been hit even harder, and the Department of Justice appears to be taking their complaints seriously: It's exploring big changes to the music publishing business for the first time since World War II.

If you look at the top songs on the Billboard charts, most of them were written by at least one professional songwriter. It's a real job.

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U.S.
3:59 pm
Mon May 4, 2015

With Baltimore Unrest, More Debate Over 'Broken Windows' Policing

New York Mayor Bill de Blasio (center), City Police Commissioner William Bratton (second from right) and other NYPD officers address a news conference on Jan. 5. There is debate surrounding the citywide increase of low-level crime enforcement, otherwise known as the broken windows approach to policing.
Richard Drew AP

Originally published on Tue May 5, 2015 5:12 am

Police departments across the country are under pressure to rethink their most aggressive tactics — and it's not just flashpoints like Ferguson and Baltimore. The New York Police Department is on the defensive about its long-standing approach known as "broken windows" policing.

Simply put, broken windows is the idea that police should aggressively crack down on low-level offenses to stop bigger crimes from happening. It's been copied all over the country, but now critics in New York say broken windows needs fixing.

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