Brian Naylor

NPR News' Brian Naylor is a correspondent on the Washington Desk.

In this role, he covers politics and federal agencies, including transportation and homeland security.

With more than 30 years of experience at NPR, Naylor has served as National Desk correspondent, White House correspondent, congressional correspondent, foreign correspondent and newscaster during All Things Considered. He has filled in as host on many NPR programs, including Morning Edition, Weekend Edition and Talk of the Nation.

During his NPR career, Naylor has covered many of the major world events, including political conventions, the Olympics, the White House, Congress and the mid-Atlantic region. Naylor reported from Tokyo in the aftermath of the 2011 earthquake and tsunami, from New Orleans following the BP oil spill, and from West Virginia after the deadly explosion at the Upper Big Branch coal mine.

While covering the U.S. Congress in the mid-1990s, Naylor's reporting contributed to NPR's 1996 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia Journalism award for political reporting.

Before coming to NPR in 1982, Naylor worked at NPR Member Station WOSU in Columbus, Ohio, and at a commercial radio station in Maine.

He earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Maine.

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The Two-Way
5:07 pm
Thu June 11, 2015

IRS Announces Effort To Fight Fraudulent Tax Returns

Originally published on Thu June 11, 2015 6:09 pm

The Internal Revenue Service, hoping to reduce the number of fraudulent tax returns filed each year, says it's partnering with several tax preparation and software firms in an effort to protect taxpayers.

The initiative, announced by IRS Commissioner John Koskinen, will include steps the IRS believes will better authenticate the identity of taxpayers and the information included on tax return submissions.

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The Two-Way
5:05 pm
Thu June 11, 2015

Union: All Data Of All Federal Employees Hacked

Originally published on Tue June 16, 2015 2:41 pm

The president of the largest federal employees union says all data for every current and retired federal employee and up to 1 million former employees were stolen by hackers. He says those data include names and Social Security numbers, military service and insurance and pension information.

The government has acknowledged that data of as many as 4 million current and former employees and retirees were stolen, but it hasn't detailed which employees were affected. Nor has it specified which data were stolen.

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The Two-Way
11:41 am
Wed June 10, 2015

After Nearly 30 Years, Librarian Of Congress Is Calling It Quits

The Librarian of Congress, James Billington, speaks at an event last year at the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C.
Kevin Wolf AP

Originally published on Thu June 11, 2015 9:30 am

The head of the world's largest library has reached the end of the story.

James Billington, who has been the librarian of Congress since the Reagan administration, says he is retiring. The Library of Congress says Billington, 86, will step down on Jan. 1, 2016.

In a statement, Billington says, "Leading this great institution ... for nearly three decades has been the honor and joy of my 42 years of public service in Washington." The statement adds:

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The Two-Way
8:25 am
Wed June 10, 2015

Amtrak Engineer Not On Cellphone Before Philadelphia Derailment, NTSB Says

Emergency personnel work at the scene the day after a deadly train derailment on May 12 in Philadelphia.
Patrick Semansky AP

Originally published on Wed June 10, 2015 8:43 am

The engineer at the controls of the Amtrak train that derailed in Philadelphia last month was not using his cellphone during the time he was operating train No. 188.

The National Transportation Safety Board on Wednesday released a long-awaited analysis of cellphone records to determine whether the engineer was distracted at the time of the May 12 accident. Eight people died and some 200 others were injured in the derailment.

The NTSB states:

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The Two-Way
3:52 pm
Tue June 9, 2015

NPR Red Cross Investigation Prompts Call For A Congressional Hearing

Originally published on Fri June 12, 2015 8:52 am

A Minnesota congressman is calling for a hearing into how the Red Cross spent millions of dollars donated for disaster relief in Haiti, following the devastating 2010 earthquake there.

The subject of a joint NPR/ProPublica investigation, the Red Cross raised nearly $500 million and promised to provide housing for more than 130,000 people, yet built just six homes.

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The Two-Way
2:58 pm
Tue June 9, 2015

Watchdog Questions Whether TSA Can Do Its Job

Homeland Security Department Inspector General John Roth testifies Tuesday before the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee that he's concerned about security lapses by the TSA.
Cliff Owen AP

Originally published on Tue June 9, 2015 4:31 pm

The inspector general of the Department of Homeland Security says his office is "deeply concerned" about the ability of the Transportation Security Administration to carry out its mission. John Roth told a hearing of the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee that despite hundreds of recommendations on security procedures "some problems appear to persist."

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The Two-Way
2:02 pm
Mon June 8, 2015

After Spending Millions On Communications, Homeland Security Fails Radio Test

Originally published on Mon June 8, 2015 3:47 pm

One of the difficulties that first responders during the Sept. 11 attacks faced was problematic communication, including radios that didn't allow different agencies to speak with one another.

It would seem like a simple problem to solve, and in the years since, the Department of Homeland Security has spent heavily, equipping agencies with new radios and special reserved frequencies for them to operate on.

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The Two-Way
9:58 am
Mon June 8, 2015

Supreme Court Strikes Down Law In Jerusalem Passport Dispute

Menachem Zivotofsky stands with his father, Ari Zivotofsky, outside the Supreme Court in Washington in 2014.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Originally published on Mon June 8, 2015 1:11 pm

Updated at 1:45 p.m. ET

The U.S. Supreme Court has struck down a law that allowed Americans who were born in Jerusalem to list Israel as their birthplace on their passports.

In a 6-3 ruling, the court said that the law, passed by Congress in 2002, interferes with the president's constitutional right to recognize foreign nations. The U.S. State Department has a long-standing policy not to recognize any nation's authority over Jerusalem until Israelis and Palestinians resolve its status.

The case is seen as an important separation-of-powers ruling.

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National Security
4:45 pm
Thu June 4, 2015

Chinese Hackers Breach Government Personnel Office Computers

Originally published on Thu June 4, 2015 6:50 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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The Two-Way
1:55 pm
Thu June 4, 2015

In A First For Online Media, Gawker Writers Join Union

Originally published on Fri June 5, 2015 7:32 pm

For the first time, workers at a digital media company have voted to join a union. Editorial employees at Gawker Media are joining the Writers Guild of America, after a vote in which 80 employees or 75 percent voted in favor of forming a union, and 27 employees, or 25 percent opposed.

In a post on the Gawker website, the editorial employees say the next steps are "determining what we want to bargain for, forming a bargaining committee and negotiating a contract."

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