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Parallels
9:00 am
Sun June 28, 2015

For Americans Seeking Affordable Degrees, German Schools Beckon

Berlin's Humboldt University — named for its founder, the 19th century philosopher and linguist Wilhelm von Humboldt, and his brother, naturalist Alexander von Humboldt, pictured here — is one of several German universities attracting U.S. students. More than 4,000 Americans are studying in German universities.
Markus Schreiber AP

Originally published on Mon June 29, 2015 12:34 pm

Looking to escape the staggering costs of a university education in the United States? You are not alone. And German education officials say a growing number of Americans are heading to the land of beer and bratwurst to get one.

At last count, there were 4,300 Americans studying at German universities, with more than half pursuing degrees, says Ulrich Grothus, deputy secretary general of the German Academic Exchange Service.

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The Two-Way
8:41 am
Sun June 28, 2015

SpaceX Falcon 9 Rocket Breaks Up On Liftoff

The SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket and Dragon spacecraft breaks apart shortly after liftoff Sunday at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida.
John Raoux AP

Originally published on Sun June 28, 2015 2:58 pm

Updated at 4:55 p.m. ET

An unmanned SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket experienced what the private space launch company calls "some type of anomaly in first-stage flight" about two and a half minutes into its flight.

NASA commentator George Diller confirmed that "the vehicle has broken up."

Pieces could be seen raining down on the Atlantic Ocean over the rocket's intended trajectory. More than 5,200 pounds of cargo, including the first docking port designed for NASA's next-generation crew capsule, were aboard.

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Author Interviews
8:00 am
Sun June 28, 2015

Two Years After Deadly Wildfire, Are There Lessons In The Ashes?

An aerial view shows the Yarnell Hill fire burning June 29, 2013 near the town of Yarnell, Ariz. The next day, 19 firefighters died battling the blaze.
Arizona State Forestry Division Getty Images

Two years ago, a wildfire was raging in the foothills of North Arizona. The Granite Mountain Hotshots, a team of elite firefighters from Prescott, Ariz., were on the ground, battling the blaze.

Then the weather and the winds shifted, and the two-day-old Yarnell Hill Fire changed course. The commander had a huge decision to make: stay on safe ground, or try to cut off the blaze?

He made the call — and before the day was over, 19 hotshot firefighters were dead. It was one of the deadliest incidents for wildland firefighters in U.S. history.

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The Two-Way
7:41 am
Sun June 28, 2015

Kuwait Says Saudi Responsible For Mosque Suicide Bombing

People gather near flag-draped coffins of Kuwaiti Shiite victims from Friday's suicide bombing at a mosque in the capital.
Khider Abbas EPA/Landov

Originally published on Sun June 28, 2015 1:13 pm

The suicide bomber who attacked a Shiite mosque in Kuwait last week, killing 27 people, was a Saudi national who flew into the neighboring Gulf nation hours before carrying out his deadly mission, Kuwaiti officials say. The self-declared Islamic State later claimed responsibility for the attack.

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It's All Politics
7:08 am
Sun June 28, 2015

A Less-Restrained Obama Finally Says 'Bucket'

With less than two years left in his presidency, President Obama has been less scripted and appears less confined by politics.
Saul Loeb AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon June 29, 2015 10:22 am

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The Two-Way
6:46 am
Sun June 28, 2015

Greece To Close Banks, Impose Capital Controls Amid Looming Default

A security worker brings money to a National Bank branch in Athens on Sunday. Greeks have been withdrawing euros in anticipation of a possible default on the country's debt payments early next week.
Marko Djurica Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Sun June 28, 2015 7:19 pm

Updated at 2:40 p.m. ET

Greece's Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras announced Sunday that banks will be closed and capital controls imposed in order to stave off a run on the euro after negotiations with the country's international lenders broke down.

He said the Athens stock market would also be closed.

However, Tsipras blamed the European Central Bank for the latest crisis after it decided not to increase the amount of emergency liquidity amid a run on the banks that saw people lined up at ATMs, many of which ran dry amid the onslaught.

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StoryCorps
6:32 am
Sun June 28, 2015

Long Before Same-Sex Marriage, 'Adopted Son' Could Mean 'Life Partner'

Civil rights leader Bayard Rustin, left, and Walter Naegle, right, became partners in the 1970s and were together until Rustin's death. Decades before gay marriage was an option, Rustin adopted Naegle to lend legal protection to their relationship.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Sun June 28, 2015 7:40 am

StoryCorps' OutLoud initiative records stories from the LGBTQ community.

As of this Friday, same-sex marriage is legal in all 50 states — thanks to a historic Supreme Court decision.

In the 1970s, this week's ruling on marriage equality was unimaginable. But many gay couples, knowing marriage was impossible, still wanted legal protection for their unions.

Iconic civil rights activist Bayard Rustin and his partner, Walter Naegle, were one such couple. The two men fell in love and were together for many years.

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NPR Story
6:17 am
Sun June 28, 2015

2 Brothers And A Team Of Mules Tackle The Historic Oregon Trail

The Oregon Trail looms large in the American imagination. But journalist Rinker Buck and his brother Nick set out to see what the experience was really like — miseries and all.
Albert Bierstadt Public Domain

Originally published on Sun June 28, 2015 7:40 am

Two 21st-century guys, a replica 19th-century wagon, some mules and a resolution: to re-live the Oregon Trail today.

Rivers, mountains, cliffs, runaway mules, cars and trucks, bad weather ... What could possibly go wrong?

Journalist Rinker Buck wanted to find out. He and his brother Nick hitched a covered wagon to mules and set off to retrace what's left of the westward path traveled by thousands of 19th-century pioneers.

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U.S.
5:51 am
Sun June 28, 2015

Part Of The Landscape For Decades, Pumpjacks Remain Essential In Shale Fields

Originally published on Sun June 28, 2015 7:40 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Salt
5:51 am
Sun June 28, 2015

Do Try This At Home: Hacking Ribs — In The Pressure Cooker

To make baby back ribs in an hour, instead of the usual three to four hours, you'll need a pressure cooker.
Photo Illustration by Ryan Kellman and Emily Bogle NPR

Originally published on Sun June 28, 2015 7:40 am

This summer, NPR is getting crafty in the kitchen. As part of Weekend Edition's Do Try This At Home series, chefs are sharing their cleverest hacks and tips — taking expensive, exhausting or intimidating recipes and tweaking them to work in any home kitchen.

This week: Making delicious, fall-off-the-bone baby back ribs in only about an hour — with a surprising piece of kitchen equipment.

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