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Law
2:54 pm
Tue July 21, 2015

Father Of Slain San Francisco Woman Testifies Before Congress

Originally published on Tue July 21, 2015 4:23 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Politics
2:54 pm
Tue July 21, 2015

Obama Calls For More Veterans Affairs Spending At VFW Convention

Originally published on Tue July 21, 2015 4:23 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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Parallels
2:54 pm
Tue July 21, 2015

U.S.-Cuba Ties Are Restored, But Most American Tourists Will Have To Wait

American tourists, like these visitors taking a guided tour in May, still have to provide one of 12 authorized reasons — such as visiting family or engaging in humanitarian work — for travel to Cuba.
Desmond Boylan AP

Originally published on Wed July 22, 2015 7:18 am

The U.S. and Cuba have restored diplomatic relations and reopened their embassies — but it's not yet open season for American tourists hoping to visit the island. The U.S. embargo on travel and business means you still have to have a valid reason to go — and that doesn't include sitting on the beach and drinking mojitos.

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Shots - Health News
2:54 pm
Tue July 21, 2015

Women's Brains Appear More Vulnerable To Alzheimer's Than Men's

Women with mild cognitive impairment, which can be a precursor to Alzheimer's, tend to decline faster than men.
Lizzie Roberts Getty Images/Ikon Images

Originally published on Tue July 21, 2015 4:23 pm

There's new evidence suggesting that women's brains are especially vulnerable to Alzheimer's disease and other problems with memory and thinking.

Women with mild cognitive impairment, which can lead to Alzheimer's, tend to decline faster than men, researchers reported this week at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference in Washington, D.C.

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Music Interviews
2:54 pm
Tue July 21, 2015

A Return To Ragas: Family Matters For Sitar Player Anoushka Shankar

Anoushka Shankar's new album, Home, marks a return to the Indian classical music her father, Ravi Shankar, taught her.
Laura Lewis / Deutsche Grammophon Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue July 21, 2015 4:23 pm

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The Two-Way
2:46 pm
Tue July 21, 2015

Court Throws Out Some Convictions Of Former Ill. Gov. Blagojevich

Former Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich waves as he departs his Chicago home for Littleton, Colo., to begin his 14-year prison sentence on March 15, 2012. The 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Chicago on Tuesday tossed out some of Blagojevich's convictions.
Charles Rex Arbogast AP

Originally published on Wed July 22, 2015 5:47 am

Updated at 2 a.m. ET

A federal appeals court in Chicago has thrown out five of 18 counts against disgraced former Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich, who is serving a 14-year sentence for abusing the authority of his office for personal financial gain.

NPR's David Schaper tells our Newscast unit the ruling allows the Chicago Democrat to be resentenced and may shorten the length of time he remains in prison.

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Goats and Soda
2:21 pm
Tue July 21, 2015

Trying To Get The World Unhooked From Hookworm

Adult hookworms, from a dog. The larva, which penetrate the skin, are even smaller.
Agency-Animal-Picture Getty Images

This week, Goats and Soda learned of a pretty icky research experiment taking place in our nation's capital. People are becoming infected with hookworm in the name of science.

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Goats and Soda
2:06 pm
Tue July 21, 2015

Female Genital Mutilation Is A U.S. Problem, Too

British actress Zawe Ashton and Agnes Pareyio, who underwent female genital mutilation as a girl in Kenya, are two of the activists featured in "Stop Cutting Our Girls," a documentary opposing the practice.
Pontso Mafethe Courtesy of Pontso Mafethe

Female genital mutilation seems like something that happens over there. Not in the United States. But in Africa, in the Middle East, in Asia.

That's not the case.

More than half a million girls now living in the U.S. are considered at risk for female genital mutilation. The procedure can range in severity from removing or cutting the clitoris — a sexual organ primarily responsible for female sexual pleasure — to sewing the vagina shut.

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The Two-Way
2:05 pm
Tue July 21, 2015

Actor Theodore Bikel Dies At Age 91

Theodore Bikel, seen here in 2013, died Monday after a long illness.
Jim Ruymen UPI /Landov

Originally published on Tue July 21, 2015 3:36 pm

Actor and musician Theodore Bikel, whose talents landed him memorable roles on the stage and screen, has died at age 91. His manager Robert Malcolm confirmed the news to NPR's Neda Ulaby, who says Bikel "died last night at a hospital in Los Angeles after a long illness."

Some of Bikel's most notable work took place on stage — starting with an early breakthrough in the London staging of A Streetcar Named Desire, in which he starred opposite Vivien Leigh.

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Shots - Health News
1:45 pm
Tue July 21, 2015

2 Gene Studies Suggest First Migrants To Americas A Complex Mix

The area around the confluence of the Silverthrone and Klinaklini glaciers in southwestern British Columbia provides a glimpse into how the terrain traveled by Native Americans in Pleistocene times may have appeared.
David J. Meltzer/Science

Originally published on Wed July 22, 2015 4:12 am

The first people to set foot in the Americas apparently came from Siberia during the last ice age.

That's the conventional wisdom.

But now there's evidence from two different studies published this week that the first Americans may have migrated from different places at different times — and earlier than people thought.

The human race has walked or paddled or sailed until it covered the globe. Scientists can trace those migrations from the stuff these people left behind: tools, dwellings or burial grounds.

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