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Remembrances
3:12 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

Bill Arhos, 'Austin City Limits' Founder, Dies At 80

Originally published on Fri April 17, 2015 8:05 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Back in 1974, an up-and-coming musician stepped onto the stage of a brand-new show on PBS called "Austin City Limits."

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "AUSTIN CITY LIMITS")

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NPR Ed
3:12 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

In New Orleans, A Second-Chance School Tries Again

Students arrive at CLA. More than half end up here after being expelled from other schools, usually for fighting, weapons or drugs.
LA Johnson NPR

Originally published on Fri April 17, 2015 8:05 pm

Principal Nicholas Dean looks at his scarred, broken office door with resignation.

"Time to get a new lock," he says.

Over the weekend, a person or persons smashed into his office, found the keys to the school van and drove off in it.

It's another day at Crescent Leadership Academy, one of New Orleans' three second-chance schools for students who have not been successful elsewhere.

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Remembrances
3:12 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

Remembering Don Quayle, NPR's First President

Don Quayle, the first president of NPR, has died at the age of 84.
Sam Kittner WAMU 88.5

Originally published on Fri April 17, 2015 8:05 pm

The first president of National Public Radio has died. Don Quayle was 84 years old. He had a long career in public broadcasting — both television and radio. NPR's Susan Stamberg reflects on his impact.

Don Quayle gave me my first radio job. It was the early '60s and he was head of the Educational Radio Network — the precursor of NPR — a skinny little network of 12 East Coast stations that developed a daily drive-time news show. He hired me to help produce it. When this national network arose, he was an obvious choice to run it.

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The Salt
2:58 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

Running A Marathon? How To Eat and Drink So You Don't Hit The Wall

Performance nutrition experts recommend stopping at all the hydration stations for a quick fill-up of a sports drink to replenish the glycogen that's being burned during a marathon.
iStockphoto

Elite runners know the drill. When you run a marathon, you've got to consume extra amounts of carbohydrate — either from food or energy gels or energy drinks — in order to go the distance.

And if you don't fuel up enough? You may hit the wall during the big event, which, believe me, is pretty miserable.

The wall comes on abruptly. Suddenly your legs feel like lead. And then you're woozy.

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Around the Nation
2:50 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

As Lake Mead Levels Drop, The West Braces For Bigger Drought Impact

Lake Mead is at its lowest levels since it was built in the late 1930s.
Kirk Siegler NPR

Originally published on Fri April 17, 2015 8:05 pm

The historic four-year drought in California has been grabbing the headlines lately, but there's a much bigger problem facing the West: the now 14-year drought gripping the Colorado River basin.

One of the most stunning places to see its impact is at the nation's largest reservoir, Lake Mead, near Las Vegas. At about 40 percent of capacity, it's the lowest it's been since it was built in the 1930s.

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The Record
2:35 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

Solving The Vinyl Comeback's Big Problem, One Antique Machine At A Time

One of the record presses on the floor at the Quality Record Pressings plant in Salina, Kan.
Courtesy of Acoustic Sounds

Saturday is Record Store Day, when independent music retailers around the country host parking-lot concerts and sell limited-edition pressings of vinyl records, which have made a small but forceful comeback in an age dominated by digital listening habits. But if there's one problem with the vinyl resurgence, it might be this: The machines that press vinyl records are decades old, and no one's building new ones, so keeping up with increased demand is hard.

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It's All Politics
2:09 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

Oklahoma City Bombing A 'Wake-Up Call' For Government Security

The Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building was "literally right up against the road so it was extremely vulnerable," said architect Barbara Nadel. One of the government's first responses was to close a two-block stretch of Pennsylvania Avenue in front of the White House.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 17, 2015 8:05 pm

Twenty years ago this Sunday, a truck bomb exploded next to the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City. One hundred sixty-eight people were killed in the blast, hundreds were injured.

The bombing prompted heightened security at federal buildings — around the nation, and especially here in Washington.

One of the government's first responses to the bombing was closing a two-block stretch of Pennsylvania Avenue in front of the White House.

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It's All Politics
1:29 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

5 Things You Should Know About Mike Huckabee

Huckabee ran the Marine Corps Marathon in 2005.
Kevin Wolf AP

Originally published on Fri April 17, 2015 5:09 pm

When former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee ran for president in 2008, he surprised many political watchers with a big a victory in the Iowa caucus. "What we have seen is a new day in American politics," he said after he was declared the winner. "This election will start a prairie fire of hope and zeal."

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The Two-Way
1:25 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

WATCH: Chimps In Uganda Look Both Ways Before Crossing

A troop of chimpanzees in Uganda has learned to look both ways before crossing a busy highway.
New Scientist

Originally published on Fri April 17, 2015 4:32 pm

Call it Darwinian evolution in action: A troop of wild chimpanzees in Uganda has learned a valuable survival skill — to look before crossing.

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The Two-Way
1:19 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

Why A Blockbuster Of A Trade Deal With Asia Matters

Freighters wait to unload cargo at the Tanjung Pagar container port in Singapore.
Roslan Rahman AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 17, 2015 3:51 pm

It has been a decade in the making, but when completed, it will be a free trade agreement to beat all others — representing 40 percent of the world's economy.

The Trans-Pacific Partnership, or TPP, agreement would bring together the economies of the U.S., Japan, Australia and nine other Pacific Rim nations, allowing the free trade of everything from agriculture to automobiles and textiles to pharmaceuticals.

President Obama said Friday that the deal is critical for the U.S. market.

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